Skip to main content
Tulane Home Tulane Home

Graphic Elements

The Tulane visual language is composed of a diverse set of elements. When they’re  used consistently and combined carefully, they create a sense of continuity throughout all our materials. 

Examples of graphical elements encouraged by the Tulane Style Guide

Obtaining graphic elements

To maintain visual consistency across all university materials, it’s important to use only the approved brand elements. To access our library of graphic elements, please contact the Office of Creative Services, creative@tulane.edu.

Shield Abstraction

This delicate linework is drawn from the shape of the shield in the university’s logo. These abstractions, in full or broken up, are used to contain or emphasize headlines, as directional elements, or as subtle background components.

Broken shields are an acceptable graphical element at Tulane, with many caveats.

Restrictions

Contact the Office of Creative Services, creative@tulane.edu to obtain these elements. Do not create new elements. Do not combine with other graphic elements. Use the abstractions above as a starting point in your designs, but limit the amount you use per page. Below are two examples of what not to do.

Don't turn shield elements upside down, and don't use top of shield alone.

DON'T turn any elements upside down. DON'T use the top of the shield alone.

Framing Corners

Created from right angles with a heavy stroke, framing corners anchor an overall composition. Use them to focus in on an action or leading message, layer them over the edges of color fields or photographs, or knock them out of a background to create interesting negative spaces.

creating framing corners, play with making them each the same length or extend or contract one of the corners

Directions
When creating framing corners, play with making them each the same length or extend or contract one of the corners. Again, be flexible by varying the length of the corners.

Restrictions
Use the examples above as a starting point in your designs, but limit the amount you use per page. Below are two examples of what not to do.

Don't make the width of the strokes uneven and don't use more than one color in an element.

DON'T make the width of the strokes uneven. DON'T use more than one color in an element.

Overlays

Color and texture overlays are a way to frame portraits and candid photography. Play with layering lighter hues and texture to allude to the environment, grit and sweat of New Orleans.

An example of the overlay graphical element.

Directions

When using overlays, use Multiply in the effects palette to blend colors together and over imagery. You can also adjust the color of the texture. You can find textures similar to these at stock photo houses like iStock by searching “stone textures”.

Restrictions

Use the elements above as a starting point as an inspiration in your designs, but limit the amount you use per page. Below are two examples of what not to do.

When doing overlays, don't use two textures together, and don't use dark colors.

DON'T use two textures together. DON'T use dark colors. Lighter hues blend over imagery better.

Photo Collage

The layered photo collage is inspired by the energy and culture of New Orleans. With this technique, it’s easy to effectively combine images of heritage and modern life at Tulane.

An example of how to use the photo overlay effect.

Directions

When creating photo collages, include a good balance of location, people and objects while considering color and subject matter in the images. For example, use sense of place photography next to a portrait, or use images that contrast color or tone. Add Multiply in your effects palette to blend the imagery together.

Restrictions

Use the elements above as a starting point as an inspiration in your designs, but limit the amount you use per page. Below are two examples of what not to do. 

Don't use images that are the same color, and don't cover up the subject in an image.
DON'T use images that are the same tone of color. DON'T cover up the subject in an image.

Illustrations

Our black-and-white illustrations, characterized by fine linear detail, evoke Victorian-era engravings. Note, however, that they should always feel timeless: perfectly at home in our 21st-Century communications. Subjects can relate to topics at hand, thematic metaphors, or elements of New Orleans and Gulf South culture.

Examples of victorian Illustrations. A crawfish, a cable car, and a lightbulb

Directions

Use the illustrations above as an inspiration for your designs, but limit the amount you use per page. You can find illustrations similar to these at stock photo houses like iStock.com by searching for “Victorian illustrations.”

Restrictions

To maintain visual consistency across all university materials, it’s important to use only the approved brand elements. To access our library of graphic elements, please contact the Office of Creative Services, creative@tulane.edu.

Below are two examples of what not to do.

DON’T use a different illustration style. DON’T use more than one color of illustrations in a single layout.

DON’T use a different illustration style. DON’T use more than one color of illustrations in a single layout.